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women who are anything less than modest about their accomplishments are harmed interpersonally. Men can also do themselves damage by being boastful, but we expect them to be aggressive. It hurts them far, far less than it hurts women.

Because of this bias, women will do better in organizations where managers are expected to advance the case for their people—where that’s the cultural norm.

- File under: reason 2025 why so-called ‘no hierarchy’ workplaces are often particularly difficult for women. More from the piece:

we’ve found that having an agent or advocate can be very helpful [in career or salary negotiations]
There are two benefits associated with having an agent when, say, you’re being considered or recruited for a position. One is that you’re perceived as more prestigious if someone is advocating for you. That’s the authority principle in action.
The liking principle also comes into play. If you have to be a broker of information about yourself, you often appear self-aggrandizing, and it rubs people the wrong way. In the research we did, we found that if an advocate for a candidate makes demands that are based on the candidate’s merits, it doesn’t harm the candidate. But if the candidate argues the very same case, it does. The people on the receiving end just don’t like that person, who comes off as a braggart.
This is especially relevant for women.

The Uses (and Abuses) of Influence - Harvard Business Review

Now, I’m not saying that not replying quickly to emails will get someone fired, and I get that we all have lives outside of work and sometimes can’t reply quickly to emails but I value it… and ultimately, don’t we all want to know what our bosses value?Why not just say, when I say jump, you better drop everything else in your life that might be remotely important and immediately respond with, “yes sir, how high sir?”


    
        (via How to help new employees be rockstars, a new approach)
Now, I’m not saying that not replying quickly to emails will get someone fired, and I get that we all have lives outside of work and sometimes can’t reply quickly to emails but I value it… and ultimately, don’t we all want to know what our bosses value?
Why not just say, when I say jump, you better drop everything else in your life that might be remotely important and immediately respond with, “yes sir, how high sir?”

(via How to help new employees be rockstars, a new approach)

As more companies turn away from public applicant pools to private worker recommendations for leads on new hires, the long-term unemployed will be even less likely to get interviews, and even more likely to remain unemployed. The Ernst & Young’s of the world are well within their legal rights to trust the judgment of their own salaried workers. But an insular professional class, turned inward against the ranks of long-term unemployed Americans, could create a permanently poorer class of Americans whose lost productivity and reliance on government will all of us poorer in the long run.

What do I say when the interviewer asks who’s taking care of my kids?

felixsalmon:

“It’s an illegal question so you can lie. I think one of the most effective lies in this situation is to say your mother or mother-in-law takes care of the kids. Say that it’s a great setup because she’s always dreamed of taking care of grandchildren and you always knew you’d want to work. Women do not need everyone to be their psychologist. When a woman interviews, she decided she wants to work. She is an adult. The world does not need to treat her like an incompetent imbecile who did not think of the ramifications of work before she interviewed. Do you think that interviewer asks men who is taking care of their kids? And if that interviewer did ask men that question, the men would think the interviewer is nuts. Which is what women should think: that the interviewer is nuts.”

Jacob Epstein: What do I say when the interviewer asks who’s taking care of my kids? 

Tagged: #women #gender #work
Every manager needs to review their last 100 network communications — text, email, SharePoint, LinkedIn, etc. — and ask themselves: What’s the mix between messages that might be interpreted as management, micromanagement and mentoring? Am I giving in to temptations that will corrode trust? Or am I using these technologies in a way that brings out my better managerial self?