a digital common place book | an @s_m_i production | one of a few

Really, Card could have stopped there. Instead, he went on to wonder “whether the victorious proponents of gay marriage will show tolerance toward those who disagreed with them when the issue was still in dispute.” His concern, ostensibly, is that someone might be petty enough not to see his movie simply because he spent years lobbying for laws that treated certain people as less than human. The fallacy he employs here — that calling out hate-speech is intolerance on par with curtailing the human rights of others — is a favorite fallback of cowards and bullies, and a way of evading responsibility for the impact of their words and actions.
- Bears repeating: 

The fallacy he employs here — that calling out hate-speech is intolerance on par with curtailing the human rights of others — is a favorite fallback of cowards and bullies, and a way of evading responsibility for the impact of their words and actions.

Orson Scott Card Responds to Ender’s Game Boycott With Ironic Plea for ‘Tolerance’ | Underwire | Wired.com

lots of people who are not versed in conversations about privilege, access and inclusion can have a difficult time when they’re brought into one without expecting it.
- Extremely well put, if no less *head against wall frustration*. A related read from Anil Dash: racist culture is a factory defect:
the best companies can do when they make something offensive in culture is to explain the method of manufacture for their broken contribution to culture. The tedious, familiar pattern of issuing a non-apology apology (“We’re sorry if anyone was offended…”) and then trying to bury the entire conversation doesn’t make things better, and it puts the burden on the victims of these misadventures to right the wrongs, instead of laying it at the feet of their creators, as should be rightly done.
Although I do completely, entirely and fundamentally disagree with the idea that “the ones privileged with the understanding and education about these issues…owe it to the communities we represent to carry this burden sometimes even though it’s not fair.” I agree that it’s not fair. I disagree with the premise that oppressed communities owe their oppressors anything at all.

Country Clubs and Deliberate Design - Anil Dash

I know in your mind you can think of times when America was attacked. One is December 7th, that’s Pearl Harbor day. The other is September 11th, and that’s the day of the terrorist attack. I want you to remember August the 1st, 2012, the attack on our religious freedom. That is a day that will live in infamy, along with those other dates.