a digital common place book | an @s_m_i production | one of a few

The New Groupthink has overtaken our workplaces, our schools and our religious institutions. Anyone who has ever needed noise-canceling headphones in her own office or marked an online calendar with a fake meeting in order to escape yet another real one knows what I’m talking about. Virtually all American workers now spend time on teams and some 70 percent inhabit open-plan offices, in which no one has “a room of one’s own.” During the last decades, the average amount of space allotted to each employee shrank 300 square feet, from 500 square feet in the 1970s to 200 square feet in 2010…
SOME teamwork is fine and offers a fun, stimulating, useful way to exchange ideas, manage information and build trust.

But it’s one thing to associate with a group in which each member works autonomously on his piece of the puzzle; it’s another to be corralled into endless meetings or conference calls conducted in offices that afford no respite from the noise and gaze of co-workers. Studies show that open-plan offices make workers hostile, insecure and distracted. They’re also more likely to suffer from high blood pressure, stress, the flu and exhaustion. And people whose work is interrupted make 50 percent more mistakes and take twice as long to finish it.

Users tell us that they want more from their apps — one or two fea­tures doesn’t sat­isfy their needs. They also tell us that they want “sim­ple” apps. Keep in mind that “sim­ple” should not be con­fused with “sim­plis­tic.” Sim­plic­ity should not be accom­plished by sac­ri­fic­ing power. Sim­plic­ity is the user expe­ri­ence. With a clut­ter of apps on their device that just do one or two things, users con­stantly switch between them — which is counter-productive. In fact, users tell us that they can’t even remem­ber what infor­ma­tion is in which app. The users are demand­ing more sim­plic­ity and com­plete­ness in their apps, and these two con­cepts should not negate one another. In addi­tion, due to the nature of sim­plis­tic apps, they don’t have stick­i­ness with users and are con­stantly replaced.
        (via Why Most To-do List Apps Are Doomed to Fail | LightArrow Inc)
Users tell us that they want more from their apps — one or two fea­tures doesn’t sat­isfy their needs. They also tell us that they want “sim­ple” apps. Keep in mind that “sim­ple” should not be con­fused with “sim­plis­tic.” Sim­plic­ity should not be accom­plished by sac­ri­fic­ing power. Sim­plic­ity is the user expe­ri­ence. With a clut­ter of apps on their device that just do one or two things, users con­stantly switch between them — which is counter-productive. In fact, users tell us that they can’t even remem­ber what infor­ma­tion is in which app. The users are demand­ing more sim­plic­ity and com­plete­ness in their apps, and these two con­cepts should not negate one another. In addi­tion, due to the nature of sim­plis­tic apps, they don’t have stick­i­ness with users and are con­stantly replaced.

(via Why Most To-do List Apps Are Doomed to Fail | LightArrow Inc)