a digital common place book | an @s_m_i production | one of a few

Early homeruns such as these gave the rookie firm an aura that suggested it could do no wrong. And institutional investors stung by a decade of mediocre venture returns were ready to buy the Andreessen Horowitz story.  By the time it raised the most recent $1.5 billion fund, Andreessen Horowitz was able to command an almost-unprecedented 30 percent “carry,” according to one of Andreessen Horowitz’s limited partners. (The 30 percent is a maximum on a sliding scale). A venture fund’s “carry,” or “carried interest,” is the share of a fund’s profits the partners get to keep for themselves after they return the initial capital invested, and it is typically only 20 percent. A 30 percent carry is almost obscene. Or rather it would be if the six main partners at Andreessen Horowitz hadn’t recently pledged half of their future venture income to charity. For them, it is not about greed. It is about defying convention.



        (via The Andreessen Horowitz Effect | Techonomy)
Early homeruns such as these gave the rookie firm an aura that suggested it could do no wrong. And institutional investors stung by a decade of mediocre venture returns were ready to buy the Andreessen Horowitz story. By the time it raised the most recent $1.5 billion fund, Andreessen Horowitz was able to command an almost-unprecedented 30 percent “carry,” according to one of Andreessen Horowitz’s limited partners. (The 30 percent is a maximum on a sliding scale). A venture fund’s “carry,” or “carried interest,” is the share of a fund’s profits the partners get to keep for themselves after they return the initial capital invested, and it is typically only 20 percent. A 30 percent carry is almost obscene. Or rather it would be if the six main partners at Andreessen Horowitz hadn’t recently pledged half of their future venture income to charity. For them, it is not about greed. It is about defying convention.

(via The Andreessen Horowitz Effect | Techonomy)

Last year, a Silicon Valley investor said: “A pregnant founder/CEO is going to fail her company.” As he contemplated an investment in a company run by a woman pregnant with twins, he thought: “How in the hell is this founder going to lead a team, build a company and change the world for these businesses carrying a kid around for the next few months and then caring for the kids after?”
- I really wish this story had included links; it mentions “a chorus of women in the blogosphere and on social media”…and links to not a single one of those women. Come on, FT.

Marissa Mayer and the motherhood penalty - FT.com

If you’re a woman or a minority (and I have to make the distinction because women now make up the majority of college graduates in this country), it’s much harder to speak up when something occurs to make you feel uncomfortable. Were I in the same situation, I’d be worried that I’d be seen as “oversensitive” or “thin-skinned.” And with good reason.